Baritone Guitar Guide: What You NEED To Know

Baritone Guitar Guide: What You NEED To Know

Eastwood is proud to have manufactured and maintained a wide selection of baritone guitars over the course of our history, so it's about time we did a comprehensive guide! Find out why you should play a baritone guitar, who plays baritone, and much more...

Eastwood Sidejack Baritone DLX - Black

The baritone guitar, though less known than it’s standard-strung counterpart, has been a staple of popular music since the rockabilly and surfing scenes of the 1950s and 60s, and it’s been popping up more recently in almost all genres of music as artists push their creative and tonal limits.

Eastwood Guitars has a wide variety of electric baritone guitars that both look amazing and sound fantastic - offering a way to make your unique style stand out. Long gone are the days when baritone guitars were associated only with 60’s imitation acts!

WHAT IS A BARITONE GUITAR?

A baritone guitar is a 6-string, long-scale guitar, meant to accommodate a lower range of notes. The standard baritone is typically tuned B to B - a perfect fourth lower than a standard 6-string guitar. Since its invention, the baritone has allowed guitar players to explore a whole new sonic range with familiar chord and scale shapes. Today, you’ll find it put to use pushing the boundaries of expression in funk, metal, pop, and a huge range of other genres and styles.

Eastwood Sidejack Baritone DLX - Metallic Blue

Picture: Sidejack Baritone DLX

WHY PLAY A BARITONE GUITAR?

If you’re a guitar player with years of experience, you’ll be all too familiar with creative slumps. If you’re caught in a cycle of playing the same riffs, getting the same sounds, and wanting more; a baritone can be the perfect tool to help your music brain think along newly inspired lines, regardless of your preferred genres or styles of play.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE BARITONE GUITAR

The baritone guitar was initially a German acoustic guitar innovation over 100 years ago. When adapted for the early electric guitar market of the 1950s and 60s, the instrument found its first popular footing in the hands of rockabilly forefather Duane Eddy. From that point, the scene expanded into 60s surf rock, the popular sounds of Glen Campbell and other country music contemporaries, and perhaps even more iconically, the spaghetti western soundtracks of Ennio Morricone.

Picture: An Early '60s Guyatone Baritone Guitar

While this was a defining era for the instrument, the baritone guitar found new life in the 90s, with an emerging hard rock scene and a particularly bright spotlight in the theme to popular television series Twin Peaks. Today, you’ll find baritone guitars in use throughout nearly all genres - from the blistering funk of Vulfpeck sideproject The Fearless Flyers to the metal stylings of Metallica and Cannibal Corpse.

Today, Eastwood has a wide-ranging palette of baritone options with a broad range of styles and design features for a guitarist of any skill level to explore.

WHO PLAYS BARITONE GUITARS?

In the past 20 years, there has been a marked increase in baritone guitar use and interest. The baritone guitar is often used by musicians of all stylistic backgrounds looking to replace or augment sounds produced by more conventional instruments or simply to add a new sound that is both familiar and strikingly fresh.

In the early days of the electric baritone guitar, names like Duane Eddy, and Glen Campbell put the instrument on the map in a big way. Furthering the signature sound of 1960s popular music, the Beach Boys founder and revered songwriter/producer Brian Wilson often used the baritone to arrange and write songs, finding a range of notes and tones that were otherwise unavailable to guitarists.

More recently, baritone guitars have been found in the hands of metal aficionados James Hetfield of Metallica, Brian ‘Head’ Welch of Korn, John Petrucci of Dream Theater, Pat O’Brian of Cannibal Corpse, and countless others. On another side of the rock spectrum, Eddie Van Halen, Dave Matthews, and Robert Smith have used the baritone frequently for recording.

Jazz giant Pat Metheny used a baritone guitar to record his 2003 solo album One Quiet Night and his 2011 solo album What's It All About. The recordings of Ani DiFranco are another great example of the baritone guitar’s contributions to both jazz and sounds that bend and defy the constraints of genre.

In 2019, Snarky Puppy’s Mark Lettieri released a baritone-centric solo album, Deep: The Baritone Sessions. Since then, he has since played baritone guitar in Vulfpeck side-project The Fearless Flyers, and brought a new wave of popularity to the instrument among funk players.

Countless musicians look to Eastwood when considering baritone guitar options. Pat Smear of the Foo Fighters, Ian Mackaye from Minor Threat, and Albert Bouchard of the Blue Oyster Cult are all known to frequently use the Eastwood Sidejack Baritone on stage. 

Albert Bouchard – Eastwood Guitars

Picture: Albert Bouchard and his Sidejack Baritone DLX

 

Thanks to our wide range of models, Eastwood Guitars is the leading manufacturer of baritone guitars in the market today, and we currently offer both semi-hollow and solid body models - including the resonator-equiped Delta-6 Baritone, and others across multiple product lines: Sidejack, Airline, Rivolta, Eastwood Classic, and our Eastwood Artist Series.

All of our baritone guitars incorporate modern manufacturing and design techniques to deliver matchless electric instruments, built to last, and ready for the studio and stage. 

What are you waiting for? Time to join the baritone guitar revolution!

 

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